When All Else Fails . . . .

Would You Know What To Do?

Know how to tell if a swimmer is in distress or is drowning – they need immediate help!

  • A swimmer in distress may still try to swim but makes little or no forward progress, and soon become a drowning victim
  • An active drowning victim may be:
    • Vertical in the water, but unable to move forward or tread water.
    • Pressing down with their arms at the side to attempt to push the head above the water
  • An inactive drowning victim is motionless on the surface or bottom of the water.

Responding to a Drowning

  • If a child is missing, check the water first
  • If you are alone with the victim
    Immediately remove the victim from the water
  • If someone is nearby, yell for help to call 9-1-1 while you remove the victim from the water and begin CPR with rescue breaths
  • If you are alone, and the victim is a child, and you know CPR with rescue breaths, begin CPR for 2 minutes, then call 9-1-1
  • If you do not know CPR, call 9-1-1 and they will instruct you once they dispatch EMS

Adult CPR

(13 years and older)

Hand Position – Two hands in center of chest (on lower half of sternum)

Chest Compressions – At least 2 inches

Rescue Breaths – Until the chest clearly rises (about 1 second per breath)

Cycle – 30 compressions and 2 rescue breaths

Rate – 30 chest compressions in about 18 seconds – (at least 100 compressions per minute)

Child CPR

(1 to 12 years old)

Hand Position – Two hands in center of chest (on lower half of sternum)

Chest Compressions – About 2 inches

Rescue Breaths – Until the chest clearly rises (about 1 second per breath)

Cycle – 30 compressions and 2 rescue breaths

Rate – 30 chest compressions in about 18 seconds (at least 100 compressions per minute)

Infant CPR

(younger than 12 months)

Hand Position – Two or three fingers in center of chest
(on lower half of sternum, just below nipple line)

Chest Compressions – About 1 ½ inches

Rescue Breaths – Until the chest clearly rises (about 1 second per breath)

Cycle – 30 compressions and 2 rescue breaths

Rate – 30 chest compressions in about 18 seconds (at least 100 compressions per minute)

Don’t wait for an emergency to happen, be prepared now